Inka Storage Systems

Inka Storage Systems PDF Author: Terry V Levine
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780806148106
Category : Incas
Languages : en
Pages : 0

Book Description
Inka storage systems financed the largest prehistoric New World empire, the Inka state, which extended almost three thousand miles along the west coast of South America and into the Andean highlands. In this volume, prominent anthropologists and archaeologists explore for the first time how Inka storage was integrated into the Inka administrative system, and how Inka authorities consolidated their power by controlling access to concentrated resources. The massive wealth accumulated in Inka storehouses was legendary in sixteenth-century accounts of the Spanish invasion of the Andes. Archaeological studies reported here reveal how and why circular and rectangular Inka structures, known as qollqa, were built at high elevations where climatic conditions protected and preserved the contents. The Inkas tailored the administration of their vast economy-which was without currency-to the resources of each region and political sophistication of the local population. They filled storehouses with agricultural products, textiles and other manufactured goods, and oro from state-owned mines, through an elaborate system of taxation based on corvée labor. As organization and deployment of economic surpluses became more efficient, Inka rulers were able to tighten their control. This major contribution to Andean studies presents research from several regions and from major Inka storage archaelogical sites-Huanuco Pampa, Pumpu, Hatun Xauxa, Valle Calchaqui and Huamachuco. The discussions range from theoretical considerations of Inka political economy to excavation and analysis of individual storage structures. Inka Storage Systems is unique-focusing on storage and emphasizing archaeological data complemented by ethnohistorical interpretations. Contributors Coreen E. Chiswell, Terence N. D'Altory, Timothy L. Earle, Christine A. Hastorf, Heidi A. Lennstrom, Terry Y. LeVine, Craig Morris, James E. Snead, John R. Topic Terry Y. LeVine was Research Associate in the Institute of Archaeology and a Research Consultant in the Fowler Museum of Cultural History, University of California, Los Angeles.

Inka Storage Systems

Inka Storage Systems PDF Author: Terry LeVine
Publisher:
ISBN: 9780806124407
Category : Business & Economics
Languages : en
Pages : 385

Book Description
Anthropologists and archaeologists explore how the Inka of pre-Columbian Yucatan integrated the technology of food storage with the political administrative system. Theoretical studies and reports of excavations combine to paint a picture of how increasing efficiency was used to buttress an increasi

Storage in Ancient Complex Societies

Storage in Ancient Complex Societies PDF Author: Linda R. Manzanilla
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 1315520966
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 350

Book Description
The ability to accumulate and store large amounts of goods is a key feature of complex societies in ancient times. Storage strategies reflect the broader economic and political organization of a society and changes in the development of control mechanisms in both administrative and non-administrative—often kinship based—sectors. This is the first volume to examine storage practices in ancient complex societies from a comparative perspective. This volume includes 14 original papers by leading archaeologists from four continents which compare storage systems in three key regions with lengthy traditions of complexity: the ancient Near East, Mesoamerica, and Andes. Storage in Ancient Complex Societies demonstrates the importance of understanding storage for the study of cultural evolution.

Comparative Perspectives on the Archaeology of Coastal South America

Comparative Perspectives on the Archaeology of Coastal South America PDF Author: Robyn E. Cutright
Publisher: Center for Comparative Arch
ISBN: 1877812889
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 270

Book Description
Thirteen papers by archaeologists from North and South America on the archaeology of coastal Ecuador, Peru, and Chile. The authors have all emphasized comparative approaches to prehispanic societies along the Pacific coast. They give preference neither to high theory nor to case-specific empirical details, but rather attempt to answer theoretically important research questions with appropriate methodologies and empirical datasets--ones that are amenable to a broad comparative view.

Comparative and Global Framing of Enslavement

Comparative and Global Framing of Enslavement PDF Author: Stephan Conermann
Publisher: Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
ISBN: 3111296911
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 222

Book Description
The study of enslavement has become urgent over the last two decades. Social scientists, legal scholars, human rights activists, and historians, who study forms of enslavement in both modern and historical societies, have sought - and often achieved - common conceptual grounds, thus forging a new perspective that comprises historical and contemporary forms of slavery. What could certainly be termed a turn in the study of slavery has also intensified awareness of enslavement as a global phenomenon, inviting a comparative, trans-regional approach across time-space divides. Though different aspects of enslavement in different societies and eras are discussed, each of the volume's three parts contributes to, and has benefitted from, a global perspective of enslavement. The chapters in Part One propose to structure the global examination of the theoretical, ideological, and methodological aspects of the "global," "local," and "glocal." Part Two, "Regional and Trans-regional Perspectives of the Global," presents, through analyses of historical case studies, the link between connectivity and mobility as a fundamental aspect of the globalization of enslavement. Finally, Part Three deals with personal points of view regarding the global, local, and glocal. Grosso modo, the contributors do not only present their case studies, but attempt to demonstrate what insights and added-value explanations they gain from positioning their work vis-à-vis a broader "big picture."

Distant Provinces in the Inka Empire

Distant Provinces in the Inka Empire PDF Author: Michael A. Malpass
Publisher: University of Iowa Press
ISBN: 158729933X
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 368

Book Description
Who was in charge of the widespread provinces of the great Inka Empire of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries: Inka from the imperial heartland or local leaders who took on the trappings of their conquerors, either by coercion or acceptance? By focusing on provinces far from the capital of Cuzco, the essays in this multidisciplinary volume provide up-to-date information on the strategies of domination asserted by the Inka across the provinces far from their capital and the equally broad range of responses adopted by their conquered peoples. Contributors to this cutting-edge volume incorporate the interaction of archaeological and ethnohistorical research with archaeobotany, biometrics, architecture, and mining engineering, among other fields. The geographical scope of the chapters—which cover the Inka provinces in Bolivia, in southeast Argentina, in southern Chile, along the central and north coast of Peru, and in Ecuador—build upon the many different ways in which conqueror and conquered interacted. Competing factors such as the kinds of resources available in the provinces, the degree of cooperation or resistance manifested by local leaders, the existing levels of political organization convenient to the imperial administration, and how recently a region had been conquered provide a wealth of information on regions previously understudied. Using detailed contextual analyses of Inka and elite residences and settlements in the distant provinces, the essayists evaluate the impact of the empire on the leadership strategies of conquered populations, whether they were Inka by privilege, local leaders acculturated to Inka norms, or foreign mid-level administrators from trusted ethnicities. By exploring the critical interface between local elites and their Inka overlords, Distant Provinces in the Inka Empire builds upon Malpass’s 1993 Provincial Inca: Archaeological and Ethnohistorical Assessment of the Impact of the Inca State to support the conclusions that Inka strategies of control were tailored to the particular situations faced in different regions. By contributing to our understanding of what it means to be marginal in the Inka Empire, this book details how the Inka attended to their political and economic goals in their interactions with their conquered peoples and how their subjects responded, producing a richly textured view of the reality that was the Inka Empire.

Empires to be remembered

Empires to be remembered PDF Author: Michael Gehler
Publisher: Springer Nature
ISBN: 3658340037
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 571

Book Description
By applying a comparative approach the volume focuses on a select group of „empires“ which are generally not in the focus of empires studies. They are studied in detail and analyzed due to a strict concept that takes into account real history and reception history as well. Reception history becomes more and more an important element in empire studies although this topic is still often more or less underdeveloped. The volume singles out a series of such “forgotten empires”. It aims to provide a methodologically clearly structured as well as a uniform and consistent approach. It develops a general set of questions that help to compare and distinguish these entities. This way the volume intends to examine and to illuminate empires that are generally ignored by modern scholarship.

Inka History in Knots

Inka History in Knots PDF Author: Gary Urton
Publisher: University of Texas Press
ISBN: 1477312641
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 320

Book Description
Inka khipus--spun and plied cords that record information through intricate patterns of knots and colors--constitute the only available primary sources on the Inka empire not mediated by the hands, minds, and motives of the conquering Europeans. As such, they offer direct insight into the worldview of the Inka--a view that differs from European thought as much as khipus differ from alphabetic writing, which the Inka did not possess. Scholars have spent decades attempting to decipher the Inka khipus, and Gary Urton has become the world's leading authority on these artifacts. In Inka History in Knots, Urton marshals a lifetime of study to offer a grand overview of the types of quantative information recorded in khipus and to show how these records can be used as primary sources for an Inka history of the empire that focuses on statistics, demography, and the "longue durée" social processes that characterize a civilization continuously adapting to and exploiting its environment. Whether the Inka khipu keepers were registering census data, recording tribute, or performing many other administrative tasks, Urton asserts that they were key players in the organization and control of subject populations throughout the empire and that khipu record-keeping vitally contributed to the emergence of political complexity in the Andes. This new view of the importance of khipus promises to fundamentally reorient our understanding of the development of the Inka state and the possibilities for writing its history.

A Companion to Early Modern Lima

A Companion to Early Modern Lima PDF Author:
Publisher: BRILL
ISBN: 9004335366
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 542

Book Description
A Companion to Early Modern Lima introduces readers to the Spanish American city which became a vibrant urban center in the sixteenth-century world. As part of Brill's Companions in American History series, this volume presents current interdisciplinary research focused on the Peruvian viceregal capital.

Southeast Inka Frontiers

Southeast Inka Frontiers PDF Author: Alconini, Sonia
Publisher: University Press of Florida
ISBN: 0813052556
Category : Social Science
Languages : en
Pages : 249

Book Description
Imperial frontiers are a fascinating stage for studying the interactions of people, institutions, and their environments. In one of the first books to explore the Inka frontier through archaeology, Sonia Alconini examines part of present-day Bolivia that was once a territory at the edge of the Inka empire. Along this frontier, one of the New World’s most powerful polities came into repeated conflict with tropical lowland groups that it could never subject to its rule. Using extensive field research, Alconini explores the multifaceted socioeconomic processes that transpired in the frontier region. Her unprecedented study shows how the Inka empire exercised control over vast expanses of land and peoples in a territory located hundreds of miles away from the capital city of Cusco, and how people on the frontier navigated the cultural and environmental divide that separated the Andes and the Amazon.