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Translating History

Translating History PDF Author: Igor Korchilov
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 068487041X
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 416

Book Description
A top Russian interpreter, who spent 30 years on the front lines of diplomacy, offers excerpts from his journals--the result of his four years spent in the service of Mikhail Gorbachev--covering the pivotal period between 1987 and 1990, and including parts of Gorbachev's conversations with Reagan, Thatcher, and Bush, among others.

Translating History

Translating History PDF Author: Igor Korchilov
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 068487041X
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 416

Book Description
A top Russian interpreter, who spent 30 years on the front lines of diplomacy, offers excerpts from his journals--the result of his four years spent in the service of Mikhail Gorbachev--covering the pivotal period between 1987 and 1990, and including parts of Gorbachev's conversations with Reagan, Thatcher, and Bush, among others.

Translating History

Translating History PDF Author: Igor Korchilov
Publisher: Scribner Book Company
ISBN:
Category : Biography & Autobiography
Languages : en
Pages : 416

Book Description
For the first time ever, the man who bridged languages and cultures to facilitate the historic East-West summits shares his insider's account of the personal and political power plays between Mikhail Gorbachev, Ronald Reagan, George Bush, Margaret Thatcher, and other world leaders. of photos.

Translating the World

Translating the World PDF Author: Birgit Tautz
Publisher: Penn State Press
ISBN: 0271080515
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 279

Book Description
In Translating the World, Birgit Tautz provides a new narrative of German literary history in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Departing from dominant modes of thought regarding the nexus of literary and national imagination, she examines this intersection through the lens of Germany’s emerging global networks and how they were rendered in two very different German cities: Hamburg and Weimar. German literary history has tended to employ a conceptual framework that emphasizes the nation or idealized citizenry, yet the experiences of readers in eighteenth-century German cities existed within the context of their local environments, in which daily life occurred and writers such as Lessing, Schiller, and Goethe worked. Hamburg, a flourishing literary city in the late eighteenth century, was eventually relegated to the margins of German historiography, while Weimar, then a small town with an insular worldview, would become mythologized for not only its literary history but its centrality in national German culture. By interrogating the histories of and texts associated with these cities, Tautz shows how literary styles and genres are born of local, rather than national, interaction with the world. Her examination of how texts intersect and interact reveals how they shape and transform the urban cultural landscape as they are translated and move throughout the world. A fresh, elegant exploration of literary translation, discursive shifts, and global cultural changes, Translating the World is an exciting new story of eighteenth-century German culture and its relationship to expanding global networks that will especially interest scholars of comparative literature, German studies, and literary history.

Translation and History

Translation and History PDF Author: Theo Hermans
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1351712489
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages : 183

Book Description
This concise and accessible textbook is a comprehensive introduction to the key historical aspects of translation. Six chapters cover essential concepts in researching and writing the history of translation and translation as history. Theo Hermans presents and explains fundamental issues and questions in a clear and lively style. He includes numerous examples and case studies and offers suggestions for further reading. Four of the six chapters take their cue from ideas about historiography that are alive among professional historians. They pay attention to the role of narrative, to the emergence of transnational, transcultural, global and entangled history, and to particular fields such as the history of concepts and memory studies. Other topics include microhistory, actor–network theory and book history. With an emphasis on methodology, how to do research in translation history and how to write it up, this is an essential text for all courses on translation history and will be of interest to anyone working in translation theory and methodology.

Translators Through History

Translators Through History PDF Author: Jean Delisle
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing
ISBN: 9027224501
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages : 364

Book Description
Acclaimed, when it first appeared, as a seminal work – a groundbreaking book that was both informative and highly readable – Translators through History is being released in a new edition, substantially revised and expanded by Judith Woodsworth. Translators have played a key role in intellectual exchange through the ages and across borders. This account of how they have contributed to the development of languages, the emergence of literatures, the dissemination of knowledge and the spread of values tells the story of world culture itself. Content has been updated, new elements introduced and recent directions in translation scholarship incorporated, providing fresh insights and a more nuanced view of past events. The bibliography contains over 100 new titles and illustrations have been refreshed and enhanced. An invaluable tool for students, scholars and professionals in the field of translation, the latest version of Translators through History remains a vital resource for researchers in other disciplines and a fascinating read for the wider public.

Charting the Future of Translation History

Charting the Future of Translation History PDF Author: Paul F. Bandia
Publisher: University of Ottawa Press
ISBN: 0776615610
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages : 353

Book Description
Over the last 30 years there has been a substantial increase in the study of the history of translation. Both well-known and lesser-known specialists in translation studies have worked tirelessly to give the history of translation its rightful place. Clearly, progress has been made, and the history of translation has become a viable independent research area. This book aims at claiming such autonomy for the field with a renewed vigour. It seeks to explore issues related to methodology as well as a variety of discourses on history with a view to laying the groundwork for new avenues, new models, new methods. It aspires to challenge existing theoretical and ideological frameworks. It looks toward the future of history. It is an attempt to address shortcomings that have prevented translation history from reaching its full disciplinary potential. From microhistory, archaeology, periodization, to issues of subjectivity and postmodernism, methodological lacunae are being filled. Contributors to this volume go far beyond the text to uncover the role translation has played in many different times and settings such as Europe, Africa, Latin America, the Middle-east and Asia from the 6th century to the 20th. These contributions, which deal variously with the discourses on methodology and history, recast the discipline of translation history in a new light and pave the way to the future of research and teaching in the field.

A History of Modern Translation Knowledge

A History of Modern Translation Knowledge PDF Author: Lieven D’hulst
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company
ISBN: 9027263876
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages : 487

Book Description
A History of Modern Translation Knowledge is the first attempt to map the coming into being of modern thinking about translation. It breaks with the well-established tradition of viewing history through the reductive lens of schools, theories, turns or interdisciplinary exchanges. It also challenges the artificial distinction between past and present and it sustains that the latter’s historical roots go back far beyond the 1970s. Translation Studies is but part of a broader set of discourses on translation we propose to label “translation knowledge”. This book concentrates on seven processes that make up the history of modern translation knowledge: generating, mapping, internationalising, historicising, analysing, disseminating and applying knowledge. All processes are covered by 58 domain experts and allocated over 55 chapters, with cross-references. This book is indispensable reading for advanced Master- and PhD-students in Translation Studies who need background information on the history of their field, with relevance for Europe, the Americas and large parts of Asia. It will also interest students and scholars working in cultural and social history.

The Routledge Handbook of Translation History

The Routledge Handbook of Translation History PDF Author: Christopher Rundle
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 131727606X
Category : Language Arts & Disciplines
Languages : en
Pages : 493

Book Description
The Routledge Handbook of Translation History presents the first comprehensive, state-of-the-art overview of this multi-faceted disciplinary area and serves both as an introduction to carrying out research into translation and interpreting history and as a key point of reference for some of its main theoretical and methodological issues, interdisciplinary approaches, and research themes. The Handbook brings together 30 eminent international scholars from a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds, offering examples of the most innovative research while representing a wide range of approaches, themes, and cultural contexts. The Handbook is divided into four sections: the first looks at some key methodological and theoretical approaches; the second examines some of the key research areas that have developed an interdisciplinary dialogue with translation history; the third looks at translation history from the perspective of specific cultural and religious perspectives; and the fourth offers a selection of case studies on some of the key topics to have emerged in translation and interpreting history over the past 20 years. This Handbook is an indispensable resource for students and researchers of translation and interpreting history, translation theory, and related areas.

A Cultural History of Translation in Early Modern Japan

A Cultural History of Translation in Early Modern Japan PDF Author: Rebekah Clements
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
ISBN: 1107079829
Category : History
Languages : en
Pages : 289

Book Description
"Translation, in one form or another, has been present in all major exchanges between cultures in history. Japan is no exception, and it is part of the standard narrative of Japanese history that translation has played a formative role in the developmentof indigenous legal and religious systems as well as literature, from early contact with China to the present-day impact of world literatures in Japanese translation. Yet translation is by no means a mainstream area of study for historians of Japan and there are no monograph-length overviews of the history of pre-modern Japanese translation available in any language"--

Natures in Translation

Natures in Translation PDF Author: Alan Bewell
Publisher: JHU Press
ISBN: 1421420961
Category : Literary Criticism
Languages : en
Pages : 415

Book Description
Understanding the dynamics of British colonialism and the enormous ecological transformations that took place through the mobilization and globalized management of natures. For many critics, Romanticism is synonymous with nature writing, for representations of the natural world appear during this period with a freshness, concreteness, depth, and intensity that have rarely been equaled. Why did nature matter so much to writers of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries? And how did it play such an important role in their understanding of themselves and the world? In Natures in Translation, Alan Bewell argues that there is no Nature in the singular, only natures that have undergone transformation through time and across space. He examines how writers—as disparate as Erasmus and Charles Darwin, Joseph Banks, Gilbert White, William Bartram, William Wordsworth, John Clare, and Mary Shelley—understood a world in which natures were traveling and resettling the globe like never before. Bewell presents British natural history as a translational activity aimed at globalizing local natures by making them mobile, exchangeable, comparable, and representable. Bewell explores how colonial writers, in the period leading up to the formulation of evolutionary theory, responded to a world in which new natures were coming into being while others disappeared. For some of these writers, colonial natural history held the promise of ushering in a “cosmopolitan” nature in which every species, through trade and exchange, might become a true “citizen of the world.” Others struggled with the question of how to live after the natures they depended upon were gone. Ultimately, Natures in Translation demonstrates that—far from being separate from the dominant concerns of British imperial culture—nature was integrally bound up with the business of empire.